Benefits of Elk

Venison is today's health conscious choice. It is a gourmet fare and is becoming more popular every year. Elk is lean, with only 22% of the meat energy derived from fat, as compared with 35% to 47% for lamb and 33% for beef. Venison is low in cholesterol, and the ratio of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids is higher than in conventional red meats. Therefore Elk has the best attributes of red meat without the perceived health risks.

Venison from elk exceeds the traditional limitations of the feral or wild shot product when produced under farmed conditions. Farm Raised Elk is the 'new style' food. Light, lean and tender. It is also rich in minerals, particularly iron and phosphorus which accounts for its rich dark coloring. Elk are productive meat animals because of their growth rates and favorable carcass composition. The dressing percentage of elk is high (55% for 6 month stags, rising to 58% for mature stags (male) and the hindquarters and saddle, with most of the high-priced cuts make up more of the carcass than in conventional meat animals.
Calories Fat (gm) Cholesterol (mg) Protein (gm)
Elk Meat, Loin Cut 159 3.3 56 25
Beef Bottom Round, Lean 214 9.76 92 31
Ground Beef 265 18.4 85 24
Pork Shoulder Cut, Lean 219 10.64 101 29
Lamb Leg Roast 178 7.62 83 25
Veal Cutlet 213 10.35 125 26
Chicken Breast 159 3.42 83 31
Turkey (light meat) 154 3.42 68 29
Salmon (pink) 138 5.75 39 20
Scallops (breaded) 215 11.0 77 17
Phosphorus Sodium Potassium Iron Calcium
Elk Meat, Loin 250 52 320 3.82 9.1
Beef Loin Steer 208 39 399 2.30 3.0
Beef Loin Heifer 210 40 417 2.20 2.9
Lamb Loin Wether 168 71 304 1.48 11.7
Lamb Loin Ram 167 77 314 1.40 13.7
Pork 200 76 370 .90 8.0
Chicken (white meat) 210 72 330 .50 10.0
Veal Cutlet 260 110 360 1.20 8.0

Elk meat is not only tasty, but is lower in fat, cholesterol and calories than 'traditional' red meats. For this reason, the demand for elk meat is increasing among health conscious consumers. Venison consumption in the U.S.A., which includes Elk meat, has more than doubled since 1992 according to the Saskatchewan Agriculture and Food Department.